Decoding Democracy: Salient features of the Indian constitution Tnpsc

Salient features of the Indian constitution

The Indian Constitution is the supreme law of India. It lays down the framework defining the fundamental political principles, establishes the structure, procedures, powers, and duties of government institutions, and sets out fundamental rights, directive principles, and the duties of citizens. It is the longest-written constitution of any sovereign country in the world.

Here are some of the salient features of the Indian Constitution:

1. Lengthiest Written Constitution

The Indian Constitution is the longest-written constitution of any sovereign country in the world. It contains 448 articles in 22 parts and 12 schedules. The length of the constitution reflects the complexity of Indian society and the desire of the framers to create a comprehensive framework for governance.

2. Drawn from Various Sources

The Indian Constitution has borrowed heavily from various sources, including the Government of India Act 1935, and the constitutions of the United States, Britain, Canada, Ireland, Australia, and South Africa. This reflects the desire of the framers to learn from the experiences of other democracies and to create a constitution that is suited to the specific needs of India.

1.AustraliaFundamental duties Ideals of justice (social, economic, and political) in the Preamble
2.CanadaFederation with a strong Centre Vesting of residuary powers in the Centre Appointment of state governors by the Centre Advisory jurisdiction of the Supreme Court
3.IrelandDirective Principles of State Policy Nomination of members to Rajya Sabha Method of election of the president
4.JapanProcedure Established by law
5.Soviet Union (USSR) (now, Russia)Suspension of Fundamental Rights During Emergency
6.UKParliamentary government Rule of Law Legislative procedure Single Citizenship Cabinet system Prerogative writs Parliamentary privileges Bicameralism
7.USFundamental rights Independence of judiciary Judicial review Impeachment of the president Removal of Supreme Court and High Court judges Post of vice-president
8.Germany (Weimar)Republic Ideals of liberty, equality, and fraternity in the Preamble
9.South AfricaProcedure for amendment in the Indian Constitution Election of members of Rajya Sabha
10.FranceRepublic Ideals of liberty, equality and fraternity in the Preamble

3. Rigidity and Flexibility

The Indian Constitution is a blend of rigidity and flexibility. The basic structure of the constitution is rigid and can only be amended by a special majority of Parliament. However, other provisions of the constitution can be amended by a simple majority of Parliament. This balance between rigidity and flexibility allows the Constitution to adapt to changing circumstances while also ensuring that its basic principles are protected.

The Indian Constitution is indeed a blend of rigidity and flexibility, striking a balance between stability and adaptability. Here’s a breakdown of both aspects:

Rigidity:

  • Basic structure doctrine: This doctrine, established by the Supreme Court in the 1970s, states that the basic structure of the Constitution cannot be amended. This protects fundamental principles like federalism, secularism, and democracy.
  • Special majority requirement: Amendments to the constitution require a special majority of both houses of Parliament. This ensures that any changes are made only with broad consensus.
  • A limited number of amending articles: The Constitution has only a few articles that explicitly deal with amendment procedures. This restricts the scope for arbitrary changes.

Flexibility:

  • Ordinary majority requirement: Most provisions of the constitution can be amended by a simple majority of Parliament. This allows for adjustments to accommodate changing circumstances and needs.
  • Enabling provisions: Several articles in the constitution explicitly empower Parliament to make laws on specific subjects, granting flexibility in policy formulation.
  • Judicial interpretation: The Supreme Court plays a crucial role in interpreting the Constitution and its provisions. This allows for adaptation to evolving societal values and contemporary challenges.

This combination of rigidity and flexibility ensures that the Indian Constitution remains a stable and enduring document, while also allowing it to adapt to changing realities and needs. This unique feature has contributed significantly to the longevity and adaptability of the Indian Constitution, making it a model for democracies around the world.

Here are some additional examples that illustrate this balance:

  • The Constitution guarantees fundamental rights, which are considered rigid and cannot be easily amended. However, the scope of these rights can be interpreted by the Supreme Court, allowing for some flexibility in their application.
  • The Constitution establishes a federal system, which is considered rigid to ensure the autonomy of states. However, the constitution also provides for mechanisms like concurrent lists and the Inter-State Council to facilitate cooperation and address inter-state issues.
  • The constitution includes Directive Principles of State Policy, which are non-justiciable but serve as guiding principles for the government. This allows for flexibility in formulating policies while keeping long-term goals in mind.

Overall, the Indian Constitution’s blend of rigidity and flexibility ensures that it remains a relevant and adaptable document, capable of guiding India’s journey towards a vibrant and inclusive democracy.

4. Federal System with Unitary Bias

India is a federal system with a strong central government. However, the Constitution also grants significant autonomy to the states. This balance between federalism and a strong central government reflects the need to maintain national unity while also respecting the diversity of India’s states.

India is a federal system with a strong central government. This unique combination of federalism and a strong center has been a defining feature of the Indian Constitution and has shaped the country’s political landscape.

Here’s how the federal system in India works:

  • Division of powers: The Indian Constitution clearly divides powers between the central government and the state governments. The central government has exclusive powers over certain subjects like defense, foreign affairs, and currency, while the state governments have exclusive powers over other subjects like agriculture, public health, and education. There is also a concurrent list of subjects where both the central and state governments can legislate.
  • Federal institutions: The Indian Constitution establishes various institutions to ensure the smooth functioning of the federal system. These include the Supreme Court, which acts as the guardian of the Constitution and resolves disputes between the central government and state governments; the Inter-State Council, which facilitates cooperation and coordination between the center and the states; and the Finance Commission, which recommends the distribution of financial resources between the center and the states.
  • Strong central government: Despite the federal structure, the Indian Constitution also grants significant powers to the central government. This is evident in features like the central government’s power to appoint governors to states, impose emergency provisions, and amend the constitution with a special majority of Parliament.

The federal system with a strong central government has been a successful model for India. It has allowed the country to maintain national unity while accommodating regional diversity and ensuring balanced development. However, this unique balance also necessitates constant vigilance and adjustments to address emerging challenges and ensure the effective and responsive governance of a diverse and dynamic nation like India.

5. Parliamentary Form of Government

India has a parliamentary form of government. The executive power is vested in the Council of Ministers, which is led by the Prime Minister. The Prime Minister and the Council of Ministers are collectively responsible to the Parliament. This system of government ensures that the executive is accountable to the legislature.

India has a parliamentary form of government, which is a key feature of its political system. Here’s how it works:

Structure and Features:

  • Executive power: The executive power is vested in the Council of Ministers, led by the Prime Minister. The Council is collectively responsible to the Parliament. This means that the government must retain the confidence of the Parliament to remain in power.
  • Legislative power: The legislative power rests with the Parliament, which comprises the Lok Sabha (lower house) and the Rajya Sabha (upper house). The Parliament is responsible for enacting laws and holding the government accountable.
  • Head of State: The President is the nominal head of state and enjoys certain ceremonial powers, but does not hold significant executive authority.
  • Role of the Prime Minister: The Prime Minister is the de facto head of government and the most powerful figure in the political system. They are responsible for appointing the Council of Ministers, formulating policies, and leading the government.
  • Parliamentary elections: Elections are held regularly to elect members of the Parliament. The party or coalition that wins the majority in the Lok Sabha forms the government.
  • Dissolution of Parliament: The President can dissolve the Lok Sabha on the advice of the Prime Minister, leading to fresh elections.

6. Integrated and Independent Judiciary

The Indian Constitution establishes an integrated and independent judiciary. The Supreme Court is the highest court in the land and has the power to interpret the Constitution and strike down laws that are inconsistent with it. This system of checks and balances ensures that the judiciary can act as a safeguard against the abuse of power by the other branches of government.

The Indian Constitution establishes an integrated and independent judiciary, which is a cornerstone of its democratic system. This means:

Integrated:

  • A single unified court system exists for both the central government and all state governments, ensuring uniformity and consistency in the application of laws across the country.
  • There is a hierarchy of courts, with the Supreme Court at the apex, followed by High Courts in each state and subordinate courts below them. This hierarchical structure ensures that appeals can be made from lower courts to higher courts, ultimately reaching the Supreme Court for final adjudication.

Independent:

  • The judiciary is independent of the executive and legislative branches of government, meaning judges are not subject to political pressure or interference in their decisions.
  • The Constitution provides safeguards for judicial independence, including the appointment of judges through a rigorous process, secure tenure, and the protection of salaries and pensions.
  • This independence ensures that the judiciary can act impartially and uphold the rule of law, protecting the rights and liberties of citizens.

Benefits of an Integrated and Independent Judiciary:

  • Rule of law: The judiciary plays a crucial role in upholding the rule of law by ensuring that laws are applied fairly and consistently throughout the country.
  • Protection of rights: The judiciary safeguards the fundamental rights and liberties of citizens against any violation by the state or other individuals.
  • Access to justice: The integrated court system provides citizens with access to justice, regardless of their location or social status.
  • Dispute resolution: The judiciary provides a forum for resolving disputes peacefully and through legal means.
  • Accountability: The judiciary acts as a check on the other branches of government, ensuring that they remain accountable for their actions.

7. Fundamental Rights

The Indian Constitution guarantees a number of fundamental rights to its citizens. These rights include the right to life, liberty, and equality; the right to freedom of religion, speech, and assembly; and the right to property. These fundamental rights are essential for protecting the individual from the arbitrary exercise of power by the state.

The Indian Constitution guarantees a number of fundamental rights to its citizens. These rights are enshrined in Part III of the Constitution, Articles 12 to 35. They are considered the bedrock of Indian democracy and a cornerstone of the rule of law.

Here are the six fundamental rights guaranteed by the Indian Constitution:

1. Right to Equality (Articles 14-18): This right prohibits discrimination on the grounds of religion, race, caste, sex, or place of birth. It ensures that all citizens are treated equally before the law and have equal access to opportunities.

2. Right to Freedom (Articles 19-22): This right guarantees six essential freedoms:

  • Freedom of speech and expression
  • Freedom to assemble peacefully and without arms
  • Freedom to form associations and unions
  • Freedom to move freely throughout India
  • Freedom to reside and settle in any part of India
  • Freedom to practice any profession or occupation

3. Right against Exploitation (Articles 23-24): This right prohibits human trafficking, forced labor, and child labor. It ensures that all citizens have the right to work under humane conditions and receive fair wages.

4. Right to Freedom of Religion (Article 25-28): This right guarantees the freedom of conscience and the right to freely profess, practice, and propagate any religion. It also provides for the right to manage religious affairs and establish and maintain religious institutions.

5. Cultural and Educational Rights (Articles 29-30): These rights protect the cultural and educational rights of minorities and ensure their right to conserve their language, script, and culture.

6. Right to Constitutional Remedies (Article 32): This right guarantees the right to move the Supreme Court for the enforcement of fundamental rights. It empowers citizens to seek judicial redressal for any violation of their fundamental rights.

These fundamental rights are fundamental to a just and equitable society. They guarantee individual liberties, protect against discrimination, and promote social justice. They are essential for ensuring that all citizens can live with dignity and freedom, regardless of their background or circumstances.

8. Directive Principles of State Policy

The Indian Constitution also includes a set of Directive Principles of State Policy. These principles are not legally enforceable, but they serve as guidelines for the government in formulating policies and legislation. The Directive Principles cover a wide range of issues, including social welfare, economic development, education, and environmental protection.

The Indian Constitution, in addition to fundamental rights, includes a set of Directive Principles of State Policy. These principles are enshrined in Part IV of the Constitution, Articles 36-51. While not directly enforceable by courts, they serve as guiding principles for the government in formulating policies and legislation.

Here are some key points about the Directive Principles of State Policy:

Nature and Purpose:

  • Non-justiciable: Unlike fundamental rights, the Directive Principles are not enforceable in courts. This means that individuals cannot file a lawsuit for violation of these principles.
  • Guiding principles: They serve as guidelines for the government in formulating and implementing policies aimed at achieving social and economic justice for its citizens.
  • Long-term goals: They represent long-term goals and aspirations for a just and equitable society.

Key Areas of Focus:

  • Social welfare: The principles promote social welfare by ensuring basic necessities like food, clothing, housing, education, and healthcare for all citizens.
  • Economic development: They emphasize balanced and equitable economic development, including fair wages, just working conditions, and opportunities for all.
  • Equal distribution of resources: They advocate for the equitable distribution of resources and the prevention of the concentration of wealth and means of production.
  • Protection of minorities and weaker sections: They provide for the protection and promotion of the interests of minorities, Scheduled Castes, Scheduled Tribes, and other weaker sections of society.
  • Environmental protection: They emphasize the importance of environmental protection and the conservation of natural resources.
  • International peace and security: They promote international peace and security and friendly relations with other nations.

9. Fundamental Duties

The Indian Constitution includes a set of Fundamental Duties for its citizens. These duties were added to the constitution in 1976. They include the duty to respect the constitution, the national flag, and the national anthem; to promote harmony and brotherhood among all the people of India; to defend the country; and to protect public property.

The Indian Constitution includes a set of Fundamental Duties for its citizens. These duties were added to the Constitution in 1976 through the 42nd Amendment Act. While not directly enforceable by courts, they serve as a moral and ethical code for citizens, promoting responsible and active citizenship.

Here are some key points about the Fundamental Duties:

1. Nature and Purpose:

  • Moral obligations: Unlike fundamental rights, which define individual entitlements, Fundamental Duties emphasize the responsibilities of citizens towards the nation.
  • Promoting national unity: They encourage citizens to uphold the values of patriotism, national unity, and integrity.
  • Enhancing civic responsibility: They aim to promote responsible and active citizenship by encouraging citizens to participate in the democratic process and contribute to the nation’s development.

2. Key Duties:

  • To abide by the Constitution and respect its ideals and institutions: This includes respecting the national flag, national anthem, and the judiciary.
  • To cherish and follow the noble ideals which inspired the national struggle for freedom: This emphasizes the importance of upholding the values of freedom, democracy, and justice.
  • To uphold and protect the sovereignty, unity, and integrity of India: This includes defending the nation against internal and external threats.
  • To promote harmony and the spirit of common brotherhood amongst all the people of India: This encourages citizens to transcend religious, linguistic, and regional differences and foster a sense of unity and belonging.
  • To renounce practices derogatory to the dignity of women: This emphasizes the importance of gender equality and respect for women.
  • To protect and improve the natural environment and have compassion for living creatures: This promotes environmental conservation and animal welfare.
  • To develop the scientific temper, humanism, and the spirit of inquiry and reform: This encourages critical thinking, innovation, and a commitment to social progress.
  • To safeguard public property and abjure violence: This emphasizes the importance of collective responsibility for public property and promoting peaceful means of conflict resolution.
  • To strive towards excellence in all spheres of individual and collective activity: This encourages citizens to achieve their full potential and contribute to the nation’s growth and development.

3. Significance and Challenges:

  • Promoting responsible citizenship: The Fundamental Duties encourage citizens to be active participants in democracy and contribute to national development.
  • Balancing rights and responsibilities: While emphasizing responsibilities, it is important to ensure that the exercise of these duties does not infringe upon the fundamental rights of individuals.
  • Creating awareness and promoting ethical behavior: Efforts are needed to create awareness about these duties among citizens and encourage their implementation in daily life.

The inclusion of Fundamental Duties in the Constitution signifies a shift towards a more comprehensive understanding of citizenship, emphasizing not just individual rights but also collective responsibilities. By fulfilling their duties, citizens can contribute to building a strong, prosperous, and just nation. However, continuous efforts are required to promote awareness, encourage ethical behavior, and ensure that these duties are not used to undermine fundamental rights.

10. Secularism

India is a secular state. This means that the state does not have a religion of its own and it treats all religions with equal respect. The principle of secularism is enshrined in the preamble to the constitution and it is reflected in various provisions of the constitution.

11. Amendment Procedure

The Indian Constitution can be amended through a special procedure. The amendment must be passed by a special majority of both houses of Parliament. In some cases, the amendment must also be ratified by a majority of the state legislatures. This process ensures that the constitution can be amended only after careful consideration and debate.

12. Single Citizenship

India has a single citizenship. This means that all citizens of India are treated equally, regardless of their religion, race, caste, or sex. The principle of single citizenship is enshrined in the constitution and it is reflected in various provisions of the constitution.

13. Universal Adult Franchise

India has a system of universal adult franchises. This means that all citizens over the age of 18 are eligible to vote in elections. The principle of universal adult franchise is enshrined in the constitution and it is reflected in various provisions of the constitution.

14. Emergency Provisions

The Indian Constitution includes a number of emergency provisions. These provisions allow the government to take extraordinary measures to deal with national emergencies.

The Emergency Provisions are a set of articles in the Indian Constitution (Articles 352 to 360) that empower the President to declare a state of emergency in the country under certain circumstances. These provisions are intended to deal with situations that threaten the security, unity, or integrity of India.

Here are the key points about the Emergency Provisions:

Types of Emergencies:

  • National Emergency (Article 352): This can be declared when the security of India or any part of its territory is threatened by war, external aggression, or armed rebellion.
  • State Emergency (Article 356): This can be declared if the President is satisfied that a situation has arisen in a state whereby the government of the state cannot be carried on in accordance with the provisions of the Constitution.
  • Financial Emergency (Article 360): This can be declared if the President is satisfied that a situation has arisen threatening the financial stability or credit of India or any part of its territory.

Consequences of Emergency Proclamation:

  • Suspension of Fundamental Rights: During a national emergency, the President can suspend most of the fundamental rights guaranteed by Part III of the Constitution. This allows the government to take strong measures to deal with the emergency situation.
  • Increased Central Power: During a state emergency, the central government can take over the administration of the state and assume all functions of the state government.
  • Economic Control: During a financial emergency, the central government can impose various economic controls, such as price controls and restrictions on foreign exchange transactions.

Safeguards against Abuse:

  • Parliamentary Approval: A proclamation of emergency must be approved by both houses of Parliament within a month of its issue.
  • Judicial Review: The Supreme Court can review the validity of a proclamation of emergency and strike it down if it finds it to be unconstitutional.
  • Time Limits: A national emergency can only remain in force for a maximum of six months unless it is extended by Parliament. A state emergency can only remain in force for a maximum of three years, after which it must be revoked or approved by Parliament.

Criticism of Emergency Provisions:

  • Potential for Abuse: The Emergency Provisions have been criticized for giving the government too much power and for being susceptible to abuse.
  • Historical Misuse: The Emergency Provisions were misused by the Indira Gandhi government in 1975-77, leading to a period of authoritarian rule and the suspension of fundamental rights.
  • Need for Reforms: There have been calls for reforms to the Emergency Provisions to make them more transparent and accountable and to prevent their misuse.

Conclusion

In conclusion, the salient features of the Constitution of India collectively embody the nation’s commitment to fostering a just, equitable, and democratic society. Envisaged by the framers as a living document, the Constitution serves as the supreme law, providing a robust framework that has withstood the test of time.

The amalgamation of diverse influences, including those from British constitutional practices, the Government of India Act, 1935, and principles of justice and liberty from various international sources, has resulted in a unique constitutional tapestry. The Indian Constitution, with its federal structure, separation of powers, and an elaborate set of fundamental rights, strives to strike a delicate balance between individual freedoms and collective welfare.

The Preamble, serving as the guiding light, encapsulates the aspirations of the people, proclaiming India as a Sovereign, Socialist, Secular, and Democratic Republic committed to securing justice, liberty, equality, and fraternity for its citizens. The Directive Principles of State Policy underscore the nation’s dedication to creating a socially just and economically equitable society.

As India continues to evolve, the Constitution remains a beacon, adapting to the changing needs of society while upholding its core principles. The salient features, from the comprehensive fundamental rights to the nuanced federal structure, reflect the wisdom and foresight of the framers who envisioned a nation governed by the rule of law and democratic ideals.

In essence, the Constitution of India stands not only as a legal document but as a testament to the democratic spirit, diversity, and unity of a nation that seeks to achieve the highest ideals for its people. It is a living testament to the resilience of democracy and the continual pursuit of a more perfect union.

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* * All the Notes in this blog, are referred from Tamil Nadu State Board Books and Samacheer Kalvi Books. Kindly check with the original Tamil Nadu state board books and Ncert Books.
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